From the Mind to the World

amandaonwriting:

Cheat Sheets for Writing Body Language

We are always told to use body language in our writing. Sometimes, it’s easier said than written. I decided to create these cheat sheets to help you show a character’s state of mind. Obviously, a character may exhibit a number of these behaviours. For example, he may be shocked and angry, or shocked and happy. Use these combinations as needed.

by Amanda Patterson

fernacular:

attack-on-cheekbones:

righteouskungfu:

officersneepsnop:

i can’t tell if this is a girl doing female to male makeup and just put on lipstick and eyemakeup or if this is a guy who put on makeup

Either way you look at it, they have a sweet stache and deserve a high five

I am so lost



He is a boy Here is his page LINK

fernacular:

attack-on-cheekbones:

righteouskungfu:

officersneepsnop:

i can’t tell if this is a girl doing female to male makeup and just put on lipstick and eyemakeup or if this is a guy who put on makeup

Either way you look at it, they have a sweet stache and deserve a high five

I am so lost

He is a boy Here is his page LINK

howtotrainyourbabyboo:

thebrookeofdragons:

hiccupinglasses:

thebrookeofdragons:

I think its cute how on the httyd website they have hiccups full name. Since we never hear it in the movies/shows/anything other than the books.
If they say his full name once in the films I will be happybrooke.

I want it to be Astrid that says it. Or his mom. Either way, I want one of those two ladies or both to scold him with his name.

yessSSSSSSSSS

I want Valka to be like “I picked that name!” And Hiccup is like “thanks. thanks a lot mom.”

Are we not going to talk about the TRIBE NAME?! 

howtotrainyourbabyboo:

thebrookeofdragons:

hiccupinglasses:

thebrookeofdragons:

I think its cute how on the httyd website they have hiccups full name. Since we never hear it in the movies/shows/anything other than the books.

If they say his full name once in the films I will be happybrooke.

I want it to be Astrid that says it. Or his mom. Either way, I want one of those two ladies or both to scold him with his name.

yessSSSSSSSSS

I want Valka to be like “I picked that name!” And Hiccup is like “thanks. thanks a lot mom.”

Are we not going to talk about the TRIBE NAME?! 

lampfury:

Hiccup - eyes

astudyinsubtext:

there is nothing I don´t love about this post

Me during a test

the-milk-eyed-mender:

ampvee:

toasty-coconut:

thebittercherry:

toasty-coconut:

I see a lot of people talk about Skype since it’s probably one of the biggest instant messaging systems around the world. Though, I’m surprised more people don’t talk about QQ…

kirschtein-relatable:

commanderimagination:

gothtigger92:

eisen-und-blut:

are we going to ignore the fact that this guy

image

who in one incarnation was raised by a tree

cannot hold the tree pose.

I guess he forgot his roots. 

did you just

ladies and gentlement, the hero of time

fashionaryhand:

Creative Fashionary sketches by Grace Ciao

Grace is a fashion illustrator from Singapore. She draws inspiration from everything around her. Her favourite materials are watercolours and flowers. Here are her amazing Fashionary sketches inspired by flowers!

timsel-kun:

attack on kids [2]
goddammit eren

timsel-kun:

attack on kids [2]

goddammit eren

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - FeetI don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.Norm

grizandnorm:

Tuesday Tips SUPER WEEK - Feet

I don’t often have to draw bare feet, unless I’m doing Life Drawing. When storyboarding, the focus is generally not on the feet. They also are usually covered (shoes, socks), or just not shown on screen that much. Nonetheless, it’s important to understand their functionality and general appeal. Keep details to a minimum, unless the character uses its bare feet to grasp things or do things with them most humans don’t. The best example of pushing feet to an extreme degree of functionality would be Disney’s Tarzan (one of my all time favorite). Other than that, don’t draw too much attention to them, but find appeal in its shapes.

Norm

lexxercise:

I’ve been getting a lot of asks lately about the brushes and textures I use in my work, so here’s a BIG FAT REFERENCE POST for those of you who were curious! Bear in mind that I’m really lazy and don’t know what half the settings do, so don’t be afraid to experiment to figure out what works best for you :>

BRUSHES

Pencil

I use the pencil tool with SAI’s native paper texture both for sketching and for applying opaque color with no blending. Lower opacities give it the feel of different pencil hardnesses, while full opacity makes it more like a palette knife, laying down hard-edged, heavy color for detail work or eventual blending with other brushes.

Ink Pen

Mostly made this because I’m lazy and I didn’t want to have to keep turning my textures off/opacity up when I wanted to ink something (even though I don’t do it very often), or lay down flat colors. I find the line quality to be much more crisp than Photoshop, and you can manually adjust in-program stabilization to help smooth out hand wobbles.

Round Brush

The plain ol’ brush tool acts as sort of an in-between for me in terms of brush flow. It’s heavier than my usual workhorse brush, for faster color application and rough blending, but not as heavy as the pencil tool, which has no blending at all. I like to use the canvas texture on this brush to help break up the unnatural smoothness that usually accompanies digital brushes, but it works just fine without.

Flat Brush

A brush tool set to flat bristle is by far my favorite to paint with. I don’t use any textures with it because I think the shape of the brush provides enough of that by itself. I use it for everything from rough washes to more refined shaping and polish. It’s just GREAT.

Watercolor

Best used for smooth blending, washes, gradients, and smoky atmospheric effects.

Cloud

Basically a grittier version of the watercolor tool, because too much smoothness weird me out. Good for clouds and fog, as the name suggests, or just less boring gradient fills.

TEXTURE OVERLAY

To further stave off the artificially smooth look of digital painting, I almost always overlay some sort of paper texture, and it’s almost always this one, which I scanned and edited myself. You’re all welcome to use it, no permission required!

Using overlays in SAI is just as easy as using them in Photoshop. Just paste the texture into its own layer above everything you want it to apply to, and change the layer mode to Overlay. That’s it!

Want a more prominent texture? Up the contrast. Something more subtle? Lower the contrast or reduce the layer opacity. You can also use a tinted overlay to adjust the overall palette and bring a little more color unity to an otherwise disparate piece! Just be aware that too much texture can hurt the readability of the work beneath it, so I’d err on the side of subtlety.

Hope that helps!

-L